Some dentists express concerns over the plastic beads added to certain toothpastes

September 19, 2014

The Washington Post reports that…

“The tiny plastic beads found in many popular toothpaste brands are approved by regulators, but dentists are becoming increasingly alarmed that the beads could cause more dental hygiene problems than they solve.”

An ABC affiliated TV station reports concern that…

A dental hygienist who noticed something strange in her patients’ mouths took action and now a major toothpaste manufacturer is making some changes.

Blogger Trish Walraven provides a list of toothpastes which contain polyethylene.

Crest Tooth Paste, before polyethylene

Crest Tooth Paste, before polyethylene

In a statement to ABC15, Procter & Gamble, the Crest manufacturer wrote:

“While the ingredient in question is completely safe, approved for use in foods by the FDA, and part of an enjoyable brushing experience for millions of consumers with no issues, we understand there is a growing preference for us to remove this ingredient. So we will.

We currently have products without microbeads for those who would prefer them. We have begun removing microbeads from the rest of our toothpastes, and the majority of our product volume will be microbead-free within six months. We will complete our removal process by March of 2016.”

But are microbeads really a threat to your dental health? In a September 16th statement, the American Dental Association, which assigns a seal of approval to certain dental products, said,

“At this time, clinically relevant dental health studies do not indicate that the Seal should be removed from toothpastes that contain polyethylene microbeads.”